David Dellman, MS, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

When someone was devoted to their company in the old days, they were called “company men.” Of course, there are “company women” too.

There are various definitions of what a company person is, but I believe they are loyal to their company. They believe that their fate and the fate of their company are closely aligned.  When the company is healthy, they are happy; when the company is in jeopardy, they don’t abandon ship. Instead, they work tirelessly to improve the company’s position in the marketplace. 

I have been a Zig Ziglar fan for many years.

His words and teaching came into my life when I was unemployed with very few employment prospects.

I have seen him speak live and in person, several times and every time was a joy.

He loves to tell stories, and one of my favorite stories is about a “company man” by the name of Jim Murphy.

The story is often referred to as the “Railroad Story” because the characters in the story worked for a railroad.

The story contrasts the careers of two men, Dave Anderson and Jim Murphy.

Both men went to work for the company at the same time.

After 20 years with the company, Dave was in charge of a work crew, and Jim was “President of the Railroad.”

When his crewmen asked Dave why, if they both started at the same time, Jim became president while Dave became a manager, Dave explained, “A little over 20 years ago Jim Murphy went to work for the railroad; I went to work for a $1.75 an hour.”

If you have committed to sign on with a company, give it all you have to give. Let your decisions be in the best interests of the company, be a company man or woman.

You may or may not rise to the level of president or CEO, but the satisfaction you will experience when you give to something bigger than yourself will make your efforts well worth it in the long run.

Take care,

David Dellman