David Dellman, MS, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

Annoying Game #1: The Hidden Salary

“I have a good idea, let’s not tell anyone about our salary range for the job. This way, we can get top talent cheap.”

Oh, yea, that’s a brilliant idea. Applicants don’t know if they can expect to earn more or less when they apply, and recruiters may get two or three screening interviews before the deal falls apart on salary.

For 26 years, I did all the recruiting for my company.

I preferred to be upfront about salary expectations so that I couldn’t waste my time or the time of those who applied.

This is about basic respect.

If you respect your candidates, tell them your salary expectations upfront.

Annoying Game #2: The Company Quiz Show

“Hey, I have another good idea; lets quiz our candidates to see how much trivia they can spit out about our agency.”

Most candidates will do basic research. Quizzing candidates about company details that most of your staff doesn’t know makes very little sense to me.

Annoying Game #3: The Job Description Test

“Okay, okay, I have another great idea, let’s ask our candidates to go line by line down our job description to tell us how their skills meet our needs but let’s not give them a copy of our job description.”

Once again – brilliant.

If you want your candidates to address specific job duties, then ask them specific questions.

Annoying Game #4: The Protected Class Sham

If you use demographic information about age, race, religion, national origin, or any other protected class as an employment criterion or screen, shame on you. It is an illegal and morally corrupt practice.

I could name a few more, but you get the idea.

The bottom line is this: Treat others with the respect and dignity that you would wish for if you were the one applying. 

Take care,

David Dellman